Connection to the BC Digital Literacy Framework

Access Inside of the Classroom 

Instructions 

Learners will be introduced to the project slowly by highlighting the use of simple machines in different applications and scaffolding mini lessons. This would allow the learners to gain understanding and develop prior knowledge which they can implement into their Rube Goldburg machine. 

At the outset, learners may be expected to work in groups. The instructor will provide learning objectives, resources, and checklists to create a Rube Goldburg machine and create a how-to-video to show their learning. In the class environment, the teacher would be able to guide the learners and offer hands-on assistance throughout the project.    

Research 

The instructor will provide guidance for the learners on what makes an effective Rube Goldberg machine. The instructor could show a few video examples in class to assist the learners in understanding that the goal is to solve a problem repeatedly. An example of a well-explained outline is https://tinkerlab.com/engineering-kids-rube-goldberg-machine/. The instructor will provide in-class support to learners in finding other resources and videos of their own. Additionally, learners can record notes on their sources of initial inspiration and ideas to reference throughout their learning journey in a hand-written or digital journal. 

Planning 

The instructor will provide some materials at school that can be supplemented with materials from home, if possible. The learners/groups will start planning their project and record ideas and goals followed shortly by a planning session with the teacher to help guide and facilitate realistic goals. Once approved the learners can move forward. 

Implementing 

Learners/groups will start prototyping and constantly analyze their results and make corrections to solve on-going problems. Learners can use different materials and tools to create their project. 

Reflecting

Learners/groups can showcase their learning by presenting their final project to the class or tours of other classes. Learners/groups will record a how-to-video of their final product to explain the functions and decisions of their design, and to demonstrate how their machine works. The learners will record their final thoughts on their machines, what they liked about it and how they could improve it or change if they completed the project again. Finally, the learners can compile their initial brainstorming idea, planning, final project and reflection video recordings into a video to showcase the journey of their Rube Goldberg Project. The video could be shown in class and shared with parents through email, private YouTube Channel, or over an approved e-portfolio site. In order to reduce learners’ digital footprints, online publishing ideally would be restricted to password protected sites that store data in Canada and follow all the FOIPPA guidelines.

 

Access Outside of the Classroom

Due to the coronavirus, learners are not able to participate in a classroom environment. Adaptations can be used in delivering the curriculum and assessing the learner’s final project while still incorporating the core competencies, digital literacy standards, and science five curriculum. 

Instructions

Learners can be introduced to the project topic either synchronously or asynchronously with the goals and objectives into completing the project. The digital platform may be designated by the school district or by the instructor. In addition, the learner may need support and guidance from an adult in the home with the hardware and software to engage with online instructions. Having options for learners who may not be present for synchronous meetings can be organized by the instructor through written or phone communication or from an audio/visual recording outlining the learning objectives.

Research

The instructor will provide a video sample of a Rube Goldberg machine, and encourage learners to complete their own research in finding inspiration into creating their project. An example is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rozV07bwebE. Alternatively, a synchronous video conference can be used for the learner to interact with the instructor in providing more support and guidance.

Planning

Learners will receive instructions for various options for recording their ideas. Learners can create a series of digital documents, photos, and/or videos to record their journey. They will record information about the materials they choose to use or not use. They will give credit to those people, such as parents and siblings, who supported the learner in planning and collecting resources for their Rube Goldberg Machine.

Implementing

Learners will experiment with various tools and objects in their home for creating their project. Learners can continue to record their journey as to what worked and didn’t work. 

“Negative results are just what I want. They’re just as valuable to me as positive results. I can never find the thing that does the job best until I find the ones that don’t.”

Thomas A. Edison

Reflecting 

The learners will record a ‘how to’ video of their final project with a demonstration of how it works. Previous recordings and reflections can be used by the learner in recalling their planning and implementation of creating their project. Learners can use people in their home as a resource in recording their video. Learners will explain their designs, problems, and solutions. Learners must list references for sources where ideas or novel methods were emulated or adapted for their projects. 

The video would need to follow FOIPPA guidelines in which content remains private. Parental consent would be needed to publish the video. Learners can submit their videos for assessment through private email or password protected site such as FreshGrade. An alternative option would be for a learner to present their ‘how to’ video synchronously if concerns surrounding saved video content were applicable.

Digital Literacies and Curriculum Applied:

Below are the digital literacies taken from the BC Digital Literacy Framework (2016)  and curriculum taken from the Grade 5 English, Science, and ADST BC Curriculum (2016). The document demonstrates how the digital literacies and curriculum apply to the grade 5 Rube Goldberg machine project.

 

EDCI 572 Curriculum Connections

Background image: “Complex Simplicity” by Jonathan Knowles is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Access Inside of the Classroom 

Instructions 

Learners will be introduced to the project slowly by highlighting the use of simple machines in different applications and scaffolding mini lessons. This would allow the learners to gain understanding and develop prior knowledge which they can implement into their Rube Goldburg machine. 

At the outset, learners may be expected to work in groups. The instructor will provide learning objectives, resources, and checklists to create a Rube Goldburg machine and create a how-to-video to show their learning. In the class environment, the teacher would be able to guide the learners and offer hands-on assistance throughout the project.    

Research 

The instructor will provide guidance for the learners on what makes an effective Rube Goldberg machine. The instructor could show a few video examples in class to assist the learners in understanding that the goal is to solve a problem repeatedly. An example of a well-explained outline is https://tinkerlab.com/engineering-kids-rube-goldberg-machine/. The instructor will provide in-class support to learners in finding other resources and videos of their own. Additionally, learners can record notes on their sources of initial inspiration and ideas to reference throughout their learning journey in a hand-written or digital journal. 

Planning 

The instructor will provide some materials at school that can be supplemented with materials from home, if possible. The learners/groups will start planning their project and record ideas and goals followed shortly by a planning session with the teacher to help guide and facilitate realistic goals. Once approved the learners can move forward. 

Implementing 

Learners/groups will start prototyping and constantly analyze their results and make corrections to solve on-going problems. Learners can use different materials and tools to create their project. 

Reflecting

Learners/groups can showcase their learning by presenting their final project to the class or tours of other classes. Learners/groups will record a how-to-video of their final product to explain the functions and decisions of their design, and to demonstrate how their machine works. The learners will record their final thoughts on their machines, what they liked about it and how they could improve it or change if they completed the project again. Finally, the learners can compile their initial brainstorming idea, planning, final project and reflection video recordings into a video to showcase the journey of their Rube Goldberg Project. The video could be shown in class and shared with parents through email, private YouTube Channel, or over an approved e-portfolio site. In order to reduce learners’ digital footprints, online publishing ideally would be restricted to password protected sites that store data in Canada and follow all the FOIPPA guidelines.

 

Access Outside of the Classroom

Due to the coronavirus, learners are not able to participate in a classroom environment. Adaptations can be used in delivering the curriculum and assessing the learner’s final project while still incorporating the core competencies, digital literacy standards, and science five curriculum. 

Instructions

Learners can be introduced to the project topic either synchronously or asynchronously with the goals and objectives into completing the project. The digital platform may be designated by the school district or by the instructor. In addition, the learner may need support and guidance from an adult in the home with the hardware and software to engage with online instructions. Having options for learners who may not be present for synchronous meetings can be organized by the instructor through written or phone communication or from an audio/visual recording outlining the learning objectives.

Research

The instructor will provide a video sample of a Rube Goldberg machine, and encourage learners to complete their own research in finding inspiration into creating their project. An example is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rozV07bwebE. Alternatively, a synchronous video conference can be used for the learner to interact with the instructor in providing more support and guidance.

Planning

Learners will receive instructions for various options for recording their ideas. Learners can create a series of digital documents, photos, and/or videos to record their journey. They will record information about the materials they choose to use or not use. They will give credit to those people, such as parents and siblings, who supported the learner in planning and collecting resources for their Rube Goldberg Machine.

Implementing

Learners will experiment with various tools and objects in their home for creating their project. Learners can continue to record their journey as to what worked and didn’t work. 

“Negative results are just what I want. They’re just as valuable to me as positive results. I can never find the thing that does the job best until I find the ones that don’t.”

Thomas A. Edison

Reflecting 

The learners will record a ‘how to’ video of their final project with a demonstration of how it works. Previous recordings and reflections can be used by the learner in recalling their planning and implementation of creating their project. Learners can use people in their home as a resource in recording their video. Learners will explain their designs, problems, and solutions. Learners must list references for sources where ideas or novel methods were emulated or adapted for their projects. 

The video would need to follow FOIPPA guidelines in which content remains private. Parental consent would be needed to publish the video. Learners can submit their videos for assessment through private email or password protected site such as FreshGrade. An alternative option would be for a learner to present their ‘how to’ video synchronously if concerns surrounding saved video content were applicable.

Digital Literacies and Curriculum Applied:

Below are the digital literacies taken from the BC Digital Literacy Framework (2016)  and curriculum taken from the Grade 5 English, Science, and ADST BC Curriculum (2016). The document demonstrates how the digital literacies and curriculum apply to the grade 5 Rube Goldberg machine project.

 

EDCI 572 Curriculum Connections

Background image: “Complex Simplicity” by Jonathan Knowles is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

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